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The topic that dominated discussions this week were the controversial statements by Elon Musk, who harshly criticized the Brazilian Supreme Federal Court, the Presidency, and by extension, our entire democratic system and national sovereignty.



This situation has sparked a new debate about the future of the internet. Some people suggest regulation as the solution, while others want to create truly Brazilian social networks. Still, it's obvious we're far from fully controlling our internet infrastructure, a goal that can't be achieved overnight.


From the emails we send to our academic searches, all our digital data goes through companies, mostly based in the United States.


In the midst of these discussions, China emerges—a country often misunderstood, even among progressive circles.


Of course, I don't expect everyone to know the details about what happens there, given the physical distance and language barriers. Moreover, our perceptions are shaped by algorithms that filter and define our reality. However, there are books on the subject, such as Internet Law in China by Guosong Shao, published by Oxford Cambridge Philadelphia New Delhi.


Internet regulation in China is often seen as antagonistic to the idea of freedom. However, whether one agrees or disagrees, China, despite being distant from the everyday contexts of many, follows strict legislation that is not dictated at the whim of an authoritarian leader.


Either way, Elon Musk has sparked a change in the narrative. China, previously seen only as the villain that censors the internet, is beginning to be recognized (within more progressive circles) as a model for regulation and development of its own platforms.


Finally, it's crucial to understand that in China, as well as here, significant decisions about the country are not made overnight. There is legislation based on fundamental national principles, such as the country's integrity.


Currently, Brazil also faces its dilemmas about internet freedom, and we may be at a turning point.


This overview leads us to an important reflection: to what extent can or should we model our digital policies based on international examples? Furthermore, how do you, the reader, perceive the intersection between freedom of expression and internet regulation, both in Brazil and in other global contexts?



If you’re a regular visitor to this space, you might have noticed the change. It’s a visual transformation, but I also intend to modify the textual format.


For some time, I’ve been seeking a place on the internet to share daily reflections, not just the denser posts I have been creating. A space where I can also present anthropological reflections akin to a "virtual field notes".



With this in mind, I decided to change the site layout and use this space to also share brief comments involving my current research and China in general; always maintaining a socio-anthropological perspective.


So, don’t be surprised if some posts are a bit more relaxed and everyday in nature. I will continue to create more substantial posts when the subject demands such depth, but I plan to intersperse these with other reflections.


Warm regards, and I hope you keep following along here.

The Chinese film market in 2024 experienced remarkable growth in the most recent Spring Festival, continuing the trend of recent decades.


The festival surpassed the 3.5 billion yuan ($492.7 million) mark in the first three days of the holiday, representing a 17% increase. The period from the 10th to the 17th of February is already considered one of the most profitable for the film market.


The animated film “Boonie Bears: Time Twist”, directed by Lin Yongchang, written by Jiang Lin, Qin Wan, and Rachel Xu, and starring Joseph S. Lambert and Tan Xiao, ranked third with a total revenue of 714 million yuan since its debut. Especially at this festival, most films share similar characteristics, drawing attention to a closer look at everyday life and addressing various social issues.


The animated film “Boonie Bears: Time Twist”, directed by Lin Yongchang, written by Jiang Lin, Qin Wan, and Rachel Xu, and starring Joseph S. Lambert and Tan Xiao, ranked third with a total revenue of 714 million yuan since its debut. Especially at this festival, most films share similar characteristics, drawing attention to a closer look at everyday life and addressing various social issues.

The highest-grossing film was the comedy "YOLO," directed by Jia Liang and starring Jia and Lei Jiayin. The total generated was about 1.3 billion yuan.


The highest-grossing film was the comedy "YOLO," directed by Jia Liang and starring Jia and Lei Jiayin. The total generated was about 1.3 billion yuan.

On the other hand, filmmaker Zhang Yimou presented a drama titled "Article 20," written by Meng Li and Tianyi Wang, and starring Jiayin Lei, Li Ma, and Zanilia Zhao. The production addresses elements of a public discussion about justifiable defense in China's Criminal Law.

On the other hand, filmmaker Zhang Yimou presented a drama titled "Article 20," written by Meng Li and Tianyi Wang, and starring Jiayin Lei, Li Ma, and Zanilia Zhao. The production addresses elements of a public discussion about justifiable defense in China's Criminal Law.

Despite the barriers that prevent such films from being shown in Brazil with the same strength as American films, streaming platforms have provided a great opportunity for access. However, many still favor North American and Chinese films produced in Taiwan.


Even so, Chinese cinema has been growing, and like films produced in other countries, Brazilian cinema also needs to be integrated into the national market with equal vigor, diversifying the country's film culture beyond a singular segment.



 

Data source: China2Brasil. Images and information about the films' technical details can be found on Cartoon Brew, SCMP, and IMDB.

Field note daily: Just notes from everyday anthropological life

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